The Enshu School of Ikebana was founded in the early 17th century  by a member of the Imperial Court of Japan (Edo Era) by Lord Kobori Enshu. Lord Enshu was a tutor to “Iemitsu” the third in the line of Tokugawa Shoguns.  He was well-versed in the arts of paintings, poetry and calligraphy.  He was also considered a great tea master of the time.  He gained further fame for his achievements as chief administrator of construction of the Shogunate’s Goverment. The artistic concepts of Lord Enshu were also expressed in the art of flower arrangement resulting in the establishment of Kado Enshu.

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The Enshu style of flower arranging became extremely popular not only among the nobles and members of the Samurai class but also among the masses. This flower arrangement style was well depicted in Ukiyoe color prints, an art which was at its height at about the same period.  During the “Bunka – Bunsei -Period” of the Edo Period, (1804-1829) the Enshu style of flower arranging spread widely throughout the country.

Like flowing calligraphy, this elegant ancient style is composed of gracefully curving lines. Cuts are made along the branch, into which wedges are inserted to form the desired shape. This is one of the chief characteristics of Kado Enshu.

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